Recent grants from our annual competitive process

Recent Community Grants

Four times a year the Hampton Roads Community Foundation awards grants to nonprofit organizations through its competitive Community Grants and Special Interest Grants program. Funding comes from generous donors' unrestricted and field of interest funds.

June 2019

In June 2019, the Hampton Roads Community Foundation awarded $593,802 in grant to eight area nonprofits. Funds came from community foundation donors’ unrestricted and field-of-interest funds.

Awarded grants were:

Hampton Roads Workforce Foundation, $150,000 over three years for the NextGen Pathways program to help 200 Chesapeake, Norfolk and Portsmouth residents between ages 16 and 24. Participants will receive job training, tutoring and internships. The program is for youth who are not in school, working or in the military and may have experienced homelessness, lived in foster homes or have disabilities.

The Endependence Center, $147,890 over three years to create the Road 2 Independence program. This Transitional Life Skills Program is for area residents ages 16 to 22 who have disabilities. The program will help prepare participants to transition to post-secondary education or careers.

Girls Influenced by Righteous Living in All Situations (G.I.R.L.S. Club), $40,800 over three years to expand an after-school tutoring and mentoring program to a Title I school in Norfolk. The program works with females who have minimal parental involvement, lack adult supervision and are at-risk of not succeeding in school.

Places and Programs for Children, $16,777 to add The Creative Curriculum to 27 Children’s Harbor early care and education classrooms in Chesapeake, Norfolk and Portsmouth. The curriculum will help teachers develop differentiated educational activities and will support student-driven learning for pre-school children. Funding comes in part from the Jeanne Atkinson Fund.    

The Planning Council, $25,000 for a planning to help a coalition of more than 14 stakeholders create a system to help disconnected or opportunity youth in Chesapeake succeed in life. Stakeholders include area nonprofits, government agencies and faith-based organizations.

STOP Inc., $15,000 to expand an after-school and summer program in Chesapeake’s Geneva Shores neighborhood. The program for youth ages 10 to 17 will focus on science, engineering, agriculture, technology and math (STEAM). Funding comes in part from the Ryan S. Crouse Fund and the Lowery D. Finley Jr. Memorial Fund.

Tidewater Community College, $154,335 for the Academy for Nonprofit Excellence to offer training courses for nonprofit professionals in Hampton Roads.

Youth Outreach Urban Resources and Services Ministry (YOURS), $44,000 over two years to implement the Natural Helpers curriculum into its Community Success Leadership Program in Norfolk’s Broad Creek and Ingleside neighborhoods. The program teaches middle- and high-school students to become peer counselors and mentors. Funding came from the Ethel T. Jones Fund and the Community Fund for Educational Achievement. 

 

 

 

 

March 2019

Grants were awarded to nonprofit organizations from donors’ unrestricted and field-of-interest funds. Organizations awarded grants included:

  • Elizabeth River Project, $135,000 over two years to create a clearinghouse of sea level rise resources for area K-12 educators and fund an expo for student projects. Funding comes in part from the Barbara Upton Wilson Fund.
  • Fort Monroe Foundation, $250,000 over two years to help convert a building at the former Fort Monroe military base in Hampton into a 16,200-square-foot visitor and education center and gateway to the historic site. Funding comes in part from the Vernon and Judith Cofer Fund.
  • Friends of the Elizabeth River Trail Foundation, $200,000 over two years to help add amenities to the 10.5-mile, multi-use pedestrian and bike trail that connects neighborhoods, businesses, universities and visitor attractions throughout Norfolk. Planned amenities include 11 trailheads with parking, hydration stations, playground and fitness equipment, bike racks and kayak launches.
  • Tidewater Community College Educational Foundation, $500,000 over five years to help build The TCC Perry Center for Visual & Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management in Norfolk’s NEON District.
  • Virginia Beach Art Center, $25,000 to help renovate a facility in the ViBe Creative District of Virginia Beach for art classes, exhibitions and interactions with local artists.
  • Virginia Beach Library Foundation, $60,000 for a new bookmobile to serve children in Virginia Beach and bring early literacy programs to child-care centers.
  • VOLUNTEER Hampton Roads, $145,000 to support VolunTier Vision, which helps match potential volunteers with nonprofit opportunities in the region.

December 2018

Grants were awarded to nonprofit organizations primarily from donors’ field-of-interest funds. Organizations awarded grants included:

  • Business Consortium for Arts Support, $475,000 to help support 36 performing and visual arts organizations. (Grant provided from the Ashinoff Family Fund, Community Fund for Arts & Culture, Lee A. & Helen G. Gifford Funds, William A. Goldback Fund, Paul S. Huber Memorial Fund, Perry and Bunny Morgan Fund and the Tyler Cultural Fund.)
  • Chesapeake Humane Society, $60,000 from the Alfred L. Nicholson Fund for animal welfare to purchase equipment.
  • Norfolk Botanical Garden, $15,000 from the Julian Haden Gary and Margaret Savage Gary Fund for the summer Children’s Garden education program Hip Homes & Happening Habitats.
  • Norfolk SPCA, $100,000 from the Alfred L. Nicholson Fund for animal welfare for improvements to the animal shelter.
  • Piano grants, $216,377 from the E.K. Sloane Fund for pianos to help six organizations buy pianos. Recipients are Bruton Parish Church, Christopher Newport University, Norfolk Academy, Virginia Wesleyan University, Williamsburg-James City County Public Schools (Warhill High School) and York County School Division (Tabb High School). 
  • Samaritan House, $20,000 from the Barbara Upton Wilson Charitable Fund for an animal shelter at one of its emergency housing units for victims of domestic violence.
  • Slover Library Foundation, $145,317 to update 21 interactive touch tables so patrons can better search and retrieve images from the Sargeant Memorial Collection. Grant provided from the Landmark Fund for Slover Technology and the Barron F. Black Article VIII Fund.
  • Tidewater Friends of Foster Care, $80,000 from the Sue Cook Winfrey Memorial Fund to support the expansion of a tutoring program for foster youth.
  • The Up Center, $28,175 from the Sue Cook Winfrey Memorial Fund for kinship care training for four licensed foster care placement agencies that will lead to placement of foster children with a family member or friend of the family.
  • Virginia Beach SPCA, $100,000 from the Alfred L. Nicholson Fund for animal welfare to improve the clinic and care of shelter animals.
  • Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities, $10,000 from the Harry F. Wall Memorial Scholarship Fund for student activities and professional development that foster an inclusive community at Hampton City high schools.
  • YWCA South Hampton Roads, $100,000 from the Sue Cook Winfrey Memorial Fund to safely house victims of abuse who are in imminent danger.

September 2018

Grants were awarded to six nonprofits organizations primarily from donors’ unrestricted and field-of-interest funds. Organizations awarded grants were:

  • Salvation Army Hampton Roads Area Command, $150,000 over three years to support H.O.P.E. Village in Norfolk, which provides housing and supportive services to homeless women and their children. Funding comes from the William A. and Jane M. Charters Fund, Christadelphian Ecclesia of Hampton Roads Helping Fund and the Dixon-Settle Fund for Women. 
  • Southeastern Virginia Health System, $356,442 over two years to start and operate a health clinic for homeless persons and other vulnerable populations at the new Virginia Beach Housing Resource Center in Virginia Beach. 
  • Together We Can Foundation, $103,100 over three years to develop a digital platform to create an electronic support network for its youth coming out of homelessness, foster care and other challenging situations. 
  • United Way of South Hampton Roads, $240,000 over three years to support educational interventions for elementary school children living in Norfolk’s St. Paul’s area.
  • Virginia Supportive Housing, $180,000 over three years for an initiative to help formerly homeless residents with potential to live independently accomplish that goal. Funding is provided by the William A. and Jane M. Charters Fund.
  • YMCA of South Hampton Roads, $10,000 for its Diabetes Prevention Program to give access to a 12-month lifestyle intervention program to area people from vulnerable populations.

June 2018

Grants awarded in June 2018 fell within the Cultural Vitality and Educational Success program areas. Funds came primarily from donors’ unrestricted and field-of-interest funds. Organizations awarded grants were:

  • An Achievable Dream Virginia Beach, $600,000 over three years to expand its program at Seatack Elementary An Achievable Dream Academy for students moving to sixth grade at Lynnhaven Middle School. 
  • Children's Health Investment Program (CHIP), $41,928 for a full-time home visiting parent educator to help low-income families in Norfolk who have children ages 0 to 6. 
  • Communities in Schools of Hampton Roads, $590,640 over three years for a site coordinators to help students at Booker T. Washington High School, Ruffner Academy and Chesterfield Academy in Norfolk and to support programs at Bayside 6th Grade Campus and Bettie F. Williams Elementary in Virginia Beach. 
  • Kairos Freedom Schools, $60,000 over three years for a summer student enrichment program at Norfolk’s Park Place Empowerment Center.
  • Mosaic Steel Orchestra, $60,000 over three years for instructors to teach music to low-income students from Hampton Roads.
  • Norfolk Botanical Garden, $450,000 for the horticulture conservatory at the Norfolk garden. 
  • Tidewater Community College, $148,017 for the Academy for Nonprofit Excellence to offer training courses for nonprofit professionals in Hampton Roads.
  • Virginia Symphony Orchestra, $20,000 to expand the School Orchestra Artistic Residency (SOAR) program so 100 Portsmouth Public Schools music students can work with professional musicians in the Porte Towne Magic after-school program. 

April 2018

Grants were awarded to 10 nonprofit organizations primarily from donors’ unrestricted and field-of-interest funds. Organizations awarded grants were:

  • Chesapeake Bay Foundation, $250,000 matching grant to design and build a mobile oyster restoration center for Hampton Roads.
  • The Children's Center, $100,000 to help construct an addition to its Suffolk center to expand its Early Head Start program from two days to five days. 
  • Children's Health Investment Program (CHIP), $100,000 to renovate its Chesapeake headquarters to accommodate additional nonprofits and community meeting space.
  • The Honor Foundation, $30,000 to pilot an online virtual campus program for transitioning Hampton Roads military service members.
  • The Mariners' Museum, $25,000 to upgrade storage conditions to archival standards at the Newport News museum.
  • Paul D. Camp Community College Foundation, $150,000 to renovate space for a regional training program to prepare warehouse, distribution, and logistics workers.
  • Senior Services of Southeastern Virginia, $25,000 to develop a plan for implementing the "No Wrong Door" Connectivity Project to improve area services for seniors, people with disabilities, veterans and caregivers.
  • StartWheel Corporation, $25,000 to create a supportive environment for Hampton Roads entrepreneurs.
  • Virginia Zoological Park, $47,492 to expand the Conservation Youth Team program to help high school students learn about environmental and conservation issues.
  • WHRO, $16,300 to expand to 20 area high schools the “Catch the King” project to help students to better understand impact of sea-level rise.

Community Grant options changed in 2017.

Read the descriptions